Mapping Early American Elections


18th Congress: Pennsylvania 1822

Pennsylvania elected eight Federalists and eighteen Democratic-Republicans to the Eighteenth Congress.

The map for this election is incomplete due to the lack of returns for some counties.

Following the 1820 Census, Pennsylvania gained three more seats in the House of Representatives.

Pennsylvania used a district system for electing members to Congress. Each district elected one member of Congress except Districts 4 and 9, which each elected three members, and Districts 7, 8, 11, and 16, which each elected two members.

In 1824, a special election was held in which George Wolf was elected to replace Thomas J. Rogers, who had resigned from office.

In 1824, a special election was held in which Alexander Thomson was elected to replace John Tod, who had resigned from office.

District Candidate Party Vote Percentage Elected
1 Samuel Breck Federalist 1,083 52.5%
1 Joel B. Sutherland Democratic-Republican 892 43.3%
2 Joseph Hemphill Federalist 2,268 58.9%
2 George M. Dallas Democratic-Republican 1,367 35.5%
2 Other candidates 218 5.6%
3 Daniel H. Miller Democratic-Republican 2,891 65.8%
3 Thomas Forrest Federalist 1,500 34.2%
4 James Buchanan Federalist 7,021 18.7%
4 Isaac Wayne Federalist 6,870 18.3%
4 Samuel Edwards Federalist 6,839 18.2%
4 William Darlington Democratic-Republican 5,723 15.2%
4 William Anderson Democratic-Republican 5,646 15%
4 Jacob Hibshman Democratic-Republican 5,539 14.7%
5 Philip S. Markley Democratic-Republican 2,022 52.5%
5 John Hughes Federalist 1,829 47.5%
6 Robert Harris Democratic-Republican 2,476 54.6%
6 John Phillips Federalist 2,057 45.4%
7 Daniel Udree Democratic-Republican 4,183 28.9%
7 Henry Wilson Democratic-Republican 3,962 27.4%
7 Ludwig Worman Federalist 3,213 22.2%
7 Peter Rhoads Federalist 3,109 21.5%
8 Samuel D. Ingham Democratic-Republican 5,417 34.5%
8 Thomas J. Rogers Democratic-Republican 4,629 29.5%
8 Samuel Sitgreaves Federalist 3,740 23.8%
8 Francis B. Shaw Federalist 1,907 12.2%
9 William Cox Ellis Federalist 6,398 18.1%
9 Samuel MacKean Democratic-Republican 6,137 17.4%
9 George Kremer Democratic-Republican 6,103 17.3%
9 Joseph Woods Democratic-Republican 5,897 16.7%
9 Henry Welles Federalist 5,290 15%
9 Henry Yearick Federalist 3,697 10.5%
9 Other candidates 1,813 5.1%
10 James S. Mitchell Democratic-Republican 1,478 unopposed
11 John Findlay Democratic-Republican 5,262 27%
11 James Wilson Democratic-Republican 4,933 25.3%
11 James MacSherry Federalist 4,713 24.2%
11 William N. Irvine Federalist 4,598 23.6%
12 John Brown Democratic-Republican 5,371 unopposed
13 John Tod Democratic-Republican 4,166 unopposed
14 Andrew Stewart Democratic-Republican 2,889 60.8%
14 Joseph Huston Federalist 1,865 39.2%
15 Thomas Patterson Democratic-Republican 1,745 67.8%
15 Walter Craig Federalist 830 32.2%
16 Walter Forward Federalist 4,420 30.2%
16 James Allison, Jr. Federalist 4,123 28.2%
16 John A. Scroggs Democratic-Republican 3,118 21.3%
16 Joel Lewis Democratic-Republican 2,960 20.2%
17 George Plumer Democratic-Republican 3,073 54.1%
17 Alexander W. Foster Federalist 2,606 45.9%
18 Patrick Farrelly Democratic-Republican 3,277 71.4%
18 Samuel Williamson Democratic-Republican 1,312 28.6%

In most cases, only candidates who received more than 5 percent of the vote in a district are reported. Other candidates are reported as a group, but only if they in aggregate received more than 5 percent of the vote. In addition, percentages for each district may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding. The term Dissenting Republican includes various breakaway factions of the Democratic-Republican party.



Mapping Early American Elections is generously funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities and developed by the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University.

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