Mapping Early American Elections


14th Congress: North Carolina 1815

North Carolina elected four Federalists and nine Democratic-Republicans to the Fourteenth Congress.

North Carolina used a district system for electing members to Congress.

In 1816, a special election was held in which Charles Hooks was elected to replace William R. King, who had resigned his office.

In 1816, a special election was held in which Weldon N. Edwards was elected to replace Nathaniel Macon, who had resigned after being elected as an U.S. Senator.

In 1816, a special election was held in which Samuel Dickens was elected to replace Richard Stanford, who died.

District Candidate Party Vote Percentage Elected
1 William Murfree Democratic-Republican 1,977 57%
1 Lemuel Sawyer Democratic-Republican 1,284 37%
1 William S. Hinton Democratic-Republican 187 5.4%
2 Joseph H. Bryan Democratic-Republican 1,943 52.2%
2 Thomas Burgess Federalist 1,781 47.8%
3 James W. Clark Democratic-Republican 2,341 53.3%
3 James B. Haughton Federalist 2,050 46.7%
4 William Gaston Federalist unopposed
5 William R. King Democratic-Republican unopposed
6 Nathaniel Macon Democratic-Republican 2,520 71.6%
6 William Person Federalist 1,000 28.4%
7 John Culpepper Federalist 2,284 86.6%
7 Other candidates 354 13.2%
8 Richard Stanford Federalist 2,013 52.3%
8 Roger Tillman Democratic-Republican 1,820 47.3%
9 Bartlett Yancey Democratic-Republican 3,139 60%
9 John Caldwell Federalist 2,091 40%
10 William C. Love Democratic-Republican 2,763 53.1%
10 Joseph Pearson Federalist 2,437 46.9%
11 Daniel M. Forney Democratic-Republican 2,185 53%
11 Joseph Graham Federalist 1,939 47%
12 Israel Pickens Democratic-Republican 2,276 51.8%
12 Felix Walker Democratic-Republican 2,117 48.2%
13 Lewis Williams Federalist 2,397 57.2%
13 Meshack Franklin Democratic-Republican 1,796 42.8%

In most cases, only candidates who received more than 5 percent of the vote in a district are reported. Other candidates are reported as a group, but only if they in aggregate received more than 5 percent of the vote. In addition, percentages for each district may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding. The term Dissenting Republican includes various breakaway factions of the Democratic-Republican party.



Mapping Early American Elections is generously funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities and developed by the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University.

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