Mapping Early American Elections


7th Congress: Pennsylvania 1800

Pennsylvania elected three Federalists and ten Democratic-Republicans to the Seventh Congress.

Pennsylvania continued to use a single-district method for electing members to Congress, except for District 4, which elected two representatives.

In 1801, a special election was held in which Democratic-Republican Issac Van Horne was elected to replace Peter Muhlenberg, who had resigned from office after his election to the U.S. Senate.

In 1801, a special election was held in which Democratic-Republican John Steward was elected to replace Thomas Hartley, who died while in office.

District Candidate Party Vote Percentage Elected
1 William Jones Democratic-Republican 1,698 50.2%
1 Francis Gurney Federalist 1,684 49.8%
2 Michael Leib Democratic-Republican 2,744 77.8%
2 John Lardner Federalist 783 22.2%
3 John Hemphill Federalist 2,732 53.3%
3 Joseph Shallcross Democratic-Republican 2,389 46.7%
4 Peter Muhlenberg Democratic-Republican 6,684 34.4%
4 Robert Brown Democratic-Republican 6,682 34.4%
4 John Arndt Federalist 3,028 15.6%
4 Cadwallader Evans Federalist 3,026 15.6%
5 Joseph Hiester Democratic-Republican 3,018 83.1%
5 Rosewell Wells Federalist 611 16.8%
6 John Andre Hanna Democratic-Republican 4,295 74.6%
6 Samuel Maclay Federalist 1,460 25.4%
7 Thomas Boude Federalist 2,274 54.1%
7 John Whitehill Democratic-Republican 1,927 45.9%
8 John Stewart Democratic-Republican 2,263 54.8%
8 John Edie Federalist 1,866 45.2%
9 Andrew Gregg Democratic-Republican 2,383 72.6%
9 David Mitchell Federalist 901 27.4%
10 Henry Woods Federalist 2,096 51.1%
10 David Bard Democratic-Republican 2,006 48.9%
11 John Smilie Democratic-Republican 2,182 unopposed
12 Albert Gallatin Democratic-Republican 4,273 72.9%
12 Presley Neville Federalist 1,590 27.1%

In most cases, only candidates who received more than 5 percent of the vote in a district are reported. Other candidates are reported as a group, but only if they in aggregate received more than 5 percent of the vote. In addition, percentages for each district may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding. The term Dissenting Republican includes various breakaway factions of the Democratic-Republican party.

New Nation Votes Data


Mapping Early American Elections is generously funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities and developed by the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University.

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